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Tag Archives: Gendered Borderlands

by Jessica Kim, Visiting Associate Director

El Paso Bridge

October 21, 2015

Scholars in the field of borderlands studies gathered at the Huntington Library earlier this month to explore how gender and borders have intersected from the eighteenth century to the present.  Panelists included Leisy Abrego (UCLA), Veronica Castillo-Muñoz (UCSB), Miroslava Chavez-Garica (UCSB), Celeste Menchaca (USC), and Andie Reid (Cal Poly SLO).  Drawing from their specific research projects while also commenting on the broader field of borderlands history, the panelists addressed innovative approaches to the question of how international borders reshape gender, family dynamics, and sexuality.  In particular, panelists noted the ways in which this important field is developing, from examining gender and medical borders, to technology and gender in the borderlands, to the ways in which families consciously create trans-border communities.

The ICW was particularly excited to host these scholars as it expands programming to include the dynamic field of borderlands history.  Please join us as we continue to explore the landscape of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands in the spring of 2016.